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The NCTQ’s “Are You Qualified to Teach Elementary School Math?”
The NCTQ’s “Are You Qualified to Teach Elementary School Math?”

The NCTQ’s “Are You Qualified to Teach Elementary School Math?”

The National Council on Teacher Quality says about their test, “Are You Qualified to Teach Elementary School Math?“:
Now available, a newly formatted version of Exit with Expertise, NCTQ’s mathematics test for elementary teachers that first appeared in No Common Denominator: The Preparation of Elementary Teachers in Mathematics by America’s Education Schools. ® 2009 National Council on Teacher Quality. All rights reserved.
Fun! Update (9:30 PM):  Some of you might look at the test and wonder “How long has it been since I did that?? I can do algebra and calculus, but I can’t do this stuff!!!” Here’s some “full disclosure:” I took the test and ended up with, by my estimate, an 88%. Some questions were easy; some I had not done in a long time, so I had to think about them more. Some of the questions (#5 and #12) I did not get, because I did not understand the language. It took me about 2 hours to work through the test. I did some of the test; had other things to attend to; did more; had other things to attend to; then finally got time to finish it off. During my first two sessions, I was hungry and spent time thinking about food…or spent time not thinking or concentrating very efficiently because I was in need of chemicals rushing around in my blood. I didn’t get the edu-ese of #5 and 12. I misunderstood exactly what they meant by #2 (I was not concentrating well because of hunger; my fault, but I’ll count it as wrong even though I knew how to do it); I didn’t take the time to figure out #6c and #15b; I was hungry and didn’t consider what I was doing on #15c and #15d (but I’ll go ahead and count those wrong even though I knew how to do them); and #22b and #22c stumped me. So that’s 7 wrong. I ended up with an 88.1% as follows. I threw out #5 and #12 (for the reason explained above), and counted each part (a, b, c, etc.) as one point. Counting all the numbers and all the b’s and c’s and such, I counted 63 points. Throwing out #5a-c and #12 leaves 63 – 4 = 59 points. So I got 59 – 7 = 52 right, for a ratio of 52/59 = 0.881356…. Update (9-11-09, 1:00 PM): Fixed a typo and pronoun mistake in my 9:30 PM, 9-10, update. Update (9-13-09, 12:00 PM): I didn’t use a calculator. Just paper, pencil, and reason.

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