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Memory: Theory and Practice
Memory: Theory and Practice

Memory: Theory and Practice

I have heard that Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer is a good book. Here are some reviews from Amazon:
Moonwalking with Einstein follows Joshua Foer’s compelling journey as a participant in the U.S. Memory Championship. As a science journalist covering the competition, Foer became captivated by the secrets of the competitors, like how the current world memory champion, Ben Pridmore, could memorize the exact order of 1,528 digits in an hour. He met with individuals whose memories are truly unique—from one man whose memory only extends back to his most recent thought, to another who can memorize complex mathematical formulas without knowing any math. Brains remember visual imagery but have a harder time with other information, like lists, and so with the help of experts, Foer learned how to transform the kinds of memories he forgot into the kind his brain remembered naturally. The techniques he mastered made it easier to remember information, and Foer’s story demonstrates that the tricks of the masters are accessible to anyone. –Miriam Landis This review is from: Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything (Hardcover) After reading the first chapter of this book online, I went out and picked up a copy and read it. I was under the impression from reading that first chapter that this book would be about Joshua’s year of training his memory. There is a large gap between knowing about a memory technique and how to actually use that technique. I was interested in reading about the author’s efforts, problems, and his solutions to those problems. Unfortunately for me, only a small part of this book actually was about the author’s actual training. He does cover a good deal of academic ground on memory. If you have a undergarduate degree in psychology, most of this material will be familiar. The author is correct when he said that this book isn’t a self-help book, but there are a few pearls within its cover. My expectations for this book resulted in my being disappointed with it. That’s my problem. I do consider the book to be a good read and would recommend it to friends and associates. –Tony R. Vaughan © 1996-2011, Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates

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